IELTS Speaking Part 3 with samples: Topic – Travel/ Holiday

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IELTS Speaking Part 3 with samples: Topic – Travel/ Holiday

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Question:

  1. What are the benefits of holidaying in a foreign country?
  2. What sorts of problems can people experience when they are abroad?
  3. Do you think foreign holidays are affordable for everyone these days?
  4. Is flying a safe way to travel?
  5. Do you think people have enough time off work?
  6. Why do some people come back from holidays more stressed than when
    they left?
  7. What safety issues do you have to think about when you go away on holiday?

IELTS Speaking tips:

Sample

1. What are the benefits of holidaying in a foreign country?

First of all, it’s a complete change of scene, which people need sometimes to help them unwind and relax. Secondly, it’s a chance to experience another culture and way of life. This is good in the sense that it broadens your horizons – and maybe you will pick up some good tips you can take back home with you. Thirdly, you get to meet the locals.
I think it’s important to meet all sorts of different people in life; it promotes tolerance and peace. If we meet people who look different or speak or behave differently to the way we do, then we will not be afraid of them or distrust them. Fourthly, you get to see things you might never otherwise be able to appreciate, like, for example, unique landscapes and areas of beauty, or different styles of architecture.

Then there is also the fact that you’ll get the chance to try out the local cuisine, and this might influence the way you cook and improve your cooking. For language learners, going to a country where they get to practice the language is probably the best way to learn, so that’s another major plus point of holidaying abroad. I think the point I’m trying to get across is that, really, the list is endless. There’s so much to get out of a foreign holiday.

2. What sorts of problems can people experience when they are abroad?

Well, I think the most obvious and common one is the language barrier. Communication can be really hard if you don’t speak the same language, not to mention the fact that there can also be embarrassing misunderstandings when things get lost in translation. Another issue that often crops up is a culture shock. For example, in some countries, they are not used to queuing and tourists can get very angry and upset at being passed out in the line. If you have a sensitive palate, you may not find the local cuisine agreeable either, which can make life very difficult by limiting your options for places to eat. Weather can also be an issue; it may be that tourists have to adapt to a hotter or colder climate than they are used to.
Another major concern is often driving. If you are used to driving on the left and you have to drive on the right side of the road during your holiday (or vice versa), this can be very trying. Crime can ruin a foreign holiday, as can the loss of your bags or wallet.
Another big spoiler is the tendency some locals have to try to take advantage of tourists and overcharge them. The list of potential problems is very, very long…

3. Do you think foreign holidays are affordable for everyone these days?

Not exactly. They are definitely more affordable than ever. I mean, flights within Europe have gone very cheap over the last ten years, and now, with the internet cutting out the middle man, you can book entire packages of flights, hotels, and activities for bargain-basement prices.
That said though, it is still expensive to go abroad for those on lower-than-average salaries, which is a shame because foreign travel can be such an enlightening experience. Besides, long-haul flights remain pricey. I mean, it certainly isn’t cheap to fly to America or Australia yet. All in all, I’d say that it’s definitely getting cheaper by the year to holiday abroad, but I think there’s a long way to go yet before we can all afford to.

4. Is flying a safe way to travel?

Nowadays, yes, I would have to say that it is. After all, great strides have been made in aviation and air travel is safer than ever before. The evidence of this is in the fact that there are fewer and fewer cases of accidents. Of course, even though the risk is small, if it goes wrong, then you are still in big trouble, but I would definitely consider flying to be a very safe form of travel today. You are far more likely to be run over by a car as a pedestrian or cyclist, or involved in a car crash as a driver than to have an accident on a plane – that’s how far aircraft safety has come.

5. Do you think people have enough time off work?

Not at all. I think the opposite is the case. Research has shown that most people are working longer and longer hours than ever before. There is huge pressure on employees to perform, so competitive in the workplace today, and this forces them to sometimes even forego their holidays in order to get things done at work. I think people, in general, deserve more time off work, both to spend with their families and to allow them to have the time to relax and unwind.
Workplace stress is a big problem that leads to many, many forms of illness, some of which are very serious. We need to look after our health more, and the only way to do that is to be allowed to take more time off work. If I were in government, I would shorten the working week. Not only would that create extra jobs, but it would also benefit all the employees who are overworked and overstressed and badly in need of a break.

6. Why do some people come back from holidays more stressed than when
they left?

Well, I think it’s easy to understand why that happens. Holidays can be stressful – dealing with a different culture or language etc. is never easy. Then there’s also the matter of having to spend a lot more time than usual with your family or friends. This can lead to arguments and it’s often hard for everyone to stay calm.
Another common problem is that people try to do and see too many things – try to pack too much into one week away in a country. They end up coming home more tired and worn out than when they left…

7. What safety issues do you have to think about when you go away on holiday?

Well, first of all, you need to consider how safe the place you are going on holiday to is. Some destinations are safer than others... I mean, in some countries, there are dictatorships and the leaders are a law unto themselves. Other places have very strict laws to do with culture or religion and you can get in big trouble for breaking them, even by accident. Besides, if you go to very religious countries, they may not be very tolerant towards foreigners, and may even be ‘anti’ them.
It may be a good idea to know the local police and emergency numbers in advance in case anything goes wrong, and also to have the contact details for your local consulate to hand in the event of something really awful happening that you need help with.
Another thing is the fact that tourists often get targeted by criminals no matter where they go, so you have to be really careful with valuables like cameras and phones, not to mention your wallet, credit cards, cash and so on, and try not to stand out too much – try not to look like a ‘tourist’. You’ve got to check out your accommodation in
advance, too, to make sure the area is a good one and that the owners are legit.
Weather factors can also affect safety – it’s important to find out if the place you are going to is prone to violent storms, earthquakes and so on. And then there are health issues; do you need vaccinations; are certain deadly diseases a problem there and so on.